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Posts Tagged ‘Phrases’

I was asked, by an educated adult, why my blog is called, Veni, Vidi, Voce. I replied that it was a play on Caesar’s “Veni, vidi, vici”, “I came, I saw, I conquered”. My reply was met with a blank stare and further conversation revealed that the individual had never heard the phrase before. I hope I don’t sound snobbish when I say, I was astonished.

Maybe I have stumbled upon another item for the Heinlein Maneuver: Latin You Should Know. This could prove to be a valuable addition because Latin lives on in plenty of English words and phrases. Following is my starting list.

Ad hoc: Literally meaning “for this,” best translated as “for this purpose” and generally used to mean improvised.

Ad infinitum: “To infinity, without end.” In context, it usually means continue forever.

Caveat emptor: “Let the buyer beware.”

Citius altius fortius: “Faster, higher, stronger” – the motto of the modern Olympics.

Et cetera: Means “and other things”, or “and so on”.

Exempli gratia: “For example,” often abbreviated “e.g.”

Id est: “That is,” often abbreviated “i.e.”

Ipso facto: “By the very fact,” i.e., “absolutely, regardless of circumstances.”

Nolo contendere: When you want to enter a plea of “No contest” in as fancy a way as possible.

Quod erat demonstrandum: “That which was to be demonstrated.” Abbreviated QED, often the end of a mathematical proof.

Subpoena: “Under penalty,” as in “Do this or you’re in trouble.”

Veni, vidi, vici: “I came, I saw, I conquered,” and the inspiration for a very interesting blog, Veni, Vidi, Voce. ☺

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